sharing our knowledge.
Photographic gallery.  Thousands of particles under the microscope.

Indoor Mite Debris

A good source for information on indoor mites is the book by A. M. Hughs, THE MITES OF STORED FOOD, Technical Bulletin No. 9, Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, London, 1961. This book can be hard to find. A very abbreviated reference but a very useful one is "Pictorial keys for the identification of domestic mites" by M. J. Colloff and F. Th. M. Spieksma in the journal Clinical and Experimental Allergy, 1992, Vol. 22, pp. 823-830.

Most of these images are from environmental tapelift samples. These were collected in homes, schools, and offices. A few are from laboratory cultures.

Mite frass contains much of the allergen associated with the mite. It is also often found when mite fragments or the the mites themselves may not be easily found.

Mite Frass (Fecal Pellets) Mite Frass (Fecal Pellets) Mite Frass (Fecal Pellets) Mite Frass (Fecal Pellets) Mite Frass (Fecal Pellets) Mite Fragment Mite Egg Mite Egg Mite Egg

MITE LEG

Mite Leg Mite Leg Mite Leg Mite Leg Mite Leg Mite Leg Mite Leg

OTHER FRAGMENTS

Mite Mite Mite Mite Mite Fragment Mite Mite Fragment Mite Fragment Mite Fragment Mite Fragment Mite Fragment Mite Fragment Mite Fragment Mite Fragment Mite Fragment Mite Fragment Mite Fragment Mite Fragment Mite Fragment Mite Fragment Mite Fragment

Tyrophagus putriscentiea (T. noxius included) is one of the most common mites in homes. It is known as the common mold mite and can be found in great numbers inhabiting established fungal colonies. It and other Tyrophagus mites have been documented as causing human health complaints since 1912. The first documentation of health complaints cause in homes by this mite was in 1957 though the Tyrophagus mites in general had been known to cause problems in a number of occupational settings. Many health problems in homes reported as "mold" problems may in fact be due to the presence of this mite. Tyrophagus is not detected by the allergen tests for Dermatophagoidies mites. (See Hughes, THE MITES OF STORED FOOD,p 42, 1961)

Tyrophagus Mite Tyrophagus Mite Tyrophagus Mite Tyrophagus Mite Tyrophagus Mite Tyrophagus Mite Tyrophagus Mite Tyrophagus Mite Tyrophagus Mite

KINGDOM: Animalia PHYLUM: Arthropoda SUBPHYLUM: Chelicerata CLASS: Arachnida SUBCLASS: Acari SUPERORDER: Acariformes ORDER: Trombidiformes SUBORDER: Eleutherengona SUPERFAMILY: Tarsonemoidea FAMILY: Tarsonemidae GENUS: Tarsonemus

Tarsonemus sp. are becoming increasingly common mites in homes in the United States. They have long been common in homes in Asia. It is known to be associated with asthma sufferers in Asia. Tarsonemus is not detected by the allergen tests for Dermatophagoidies mites.

Mite Mite Tarsonemus Female Mite Tarsonemus Male Mite Tarsonemus Male Mite Tarsonemus Male Mite Tarsonemus Female Mite Oribata Mite Oribata Mite Oribata Mite Oribata Mite Oribata Mite

KINGDOM: Animalia DIVISION: Arthropoda CLASS: Arachinida SUBCLASS: Acari ORDER: Trombidiformes FAMILY: Demodicideae GENUS: Demodex SPECIES: folliculorum

These mites inhabit the human skin, living in the hair follicles. A closely related species Demodex brevis, lives in the sebaceous glands rather than the hair follicles.

Demodex folliculorum Demodex folliculorum Mite Mite Mite Mite Mite Mite Mite Mite Mite Mite Mite Mite Mite Mite Mite Mite Mite Mite Mite Mite Indoor Mite Indoor Mite Indoor Mite Indoor Mite Indoor Mite Indoor Mite Indoor Mite Indoor Mite Indoor Mite